Tag Archives: Globalization

Heidegger and the Global Age (2017)

Heidegger and the Global Ageeds. Antonio Cerella and Louiza Odysseos

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“Globalization is one of the most contested and (ab)used concepts of our time. Whether one interprets it as a ‘collective illusion’ or as the final stage of capitalism, as ‘uncontrollable multitude’ or as a radical opening of new spaces of freedom, the ‘global age’ represents the conceptual and existential background of our being-in-the-world. But what lies behind this process? What mode of human existence is brought about by the age of technology and ‘global mobilization’? And is it possible to attempt a unitary interpretation of this age that presents itself as both total and pluralistic?

This volume rethinks these epochal questions in light of Martin Heidegger’s complex hermeneutics, proposing at the same time that such questions enable the interrogation of some of its most fundamental aspects: the metanarrative of Seinsgeschichte as withdrawal of Being; the structure of human existence within the frame of technology; the relation between humanism and nihilism, as well as politics and technology; the changing character of subjectivity in the ‘age of the world picture’; the mythopoeic force of art and the uprooting of human beings. As this volume shows, interrogating Heidegger’s thought has significant potential for both International Political Theory and also the analysis of specific concepts and dynamics in contemporary international studies, such as the changing character of spatiality, temporality, and subjectivity.”

Political Theory Without Borders (2016)

Political Theory Without Borders / Edition 1

eds. Robert E. Goodin
and James S. Fishkin

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“Political Theory Without Borders offers a comprehensive survey of the issues that have shaped political theory in the wake of social and environmental globalization.

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  • Focuses on specific questions that arise from issues of global spillovers like climate change and pollution, international immigration, and political intervention abroad
  • Includes chapters written by some of the best new scholars working in the field today, along with key texts from some of the most well-known scholars of previous generations
  • Illustrates how the classics concerns of political theory – justice and equality, liberty and oppression – have re-emerged with renewed significance at the global level
  • The newest volume in the distinguished philosophy, politics & society series, initiated by Peter Laslett in 1956.”

Being in the World: Dialogue and Cosmopolis (2015)

Being in the World: Dialogue and Cosmopolis

by Fred Dallmayr

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“It is commonly agreed that we live in an age of globalization, but the profound consequences of this development are rarely understood. Usually, globalization is equated with the expansion of economic and financial markets and the proliferation of global networks of communication. In truth, much more is at stake: Traditional concepts of individual and national identity as well as perceived relationships between the self and others are undergoing profound change. Every town has become a potential cosmopolis―an international city―affecting the way that people conceptualize the relationship between public order and political practice.

In Being in the World, noted political theorist Fred Dallmayr explores the globe’s transition from the traditional Westphalian system of states to today’s interlocking cosmopolitan network. Drawing upon sacred scriptures as well as the work of ancient philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle and more recent scholars such as Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, and Raimon Panikkar, this book delves into what Dallmayr calls “being in the world,” seen as an aspect of ethical-political engagement. Rather than lamenting current problems, he suggests addressing them through civic education and cosmopolitan citizenship. Dallmayr advocates a politics of the common good, which requires the cultivation of public ethics, open dialogue, and civic responsibility.”