Category Archives: Heidegger, Martin (1889 – 1976 ce)

Heidegger and the Global Age (2017)

Heidegger and the Global Ageeds. Antonio Cerella and Louiza Odysseos

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“Globalization is one of the most contested and (ab)used concepts of our time. Whether one interprets it as a ‘collective illusion’ or as the final stage of capitalism, as ‘uncontrollable multitude’ or as a radical opening of new spaces of freedom, the ‘global age’ represents the conceptual and existential background of our being-in-the-world. But what lies behind this process? What mode of human existence is brought about by the age of technology and ‘global mobilization’? And is it possible to attempt a unitary interpretation of this age that presents itself as both total and pluralistic?

This volume rethinks these epochal questions in light of Martin Heidegger’s complex hermeneutics, proposing at the same time that such questions enable the interrogation of some of its most fundamental aspects: the metanarrative of Seinsgeschichte as withdrawal of Being; the structure of human existence within the frame of technology; the relation between humanism and nihilism, as well as politics and technology; the changing character of subjectivity in the ‘age of the world picture’; the mythopoeic force of art and the uprooting of human beings. As this volume shows, interrogating Heidegger’s thought has significant potential for both International Political Theory and also the analysis of specific concepts and dynamics in contemporary international studies, such as the changing character of spatiality, temporality, and subjectivity.”

Heidegger, History and the Holocaust (2017)

by
Mahon O’Brien

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“An important contribution to the longstanding debate concerning Martin Heidegger’s association with National Socialism. Although a difficult topic, this ambitious new work moves the entire debate on the Heidegger controversy forward.

Following Being and Time Heidegger expands on his notion of authenticity and related notions such as historicity and discusses the possibility of an authentic Dasein of a people along structurally consistent lines to his account of authenticity in Being and Time. O’Brien argues that the same difficulties which appear to hamstring the early account of authenticity further affect the notion of an authentic Dasein of a people; Heidegger’s political myopia in the thirties can thus be attributed to an underlying failure to come to terms with some of the difficulties discussed in this study. O’Brien concedes that Heidegger’s philosophy is influenced by its historical period and context but argues that, however inflammatory, Heidegger’s rhetoric cannot be simply reduced to crude Nazi jingoism.

This book is a genuinely philosophical approach to the Heidegger controversy and a much-needed re-examination of his ideas and influences.”